Hidden Human Story
 
Discover the story of an ancient family that changed the world over 15,000 years ago....

Discover the story of a family from ancient Tyre, Byblos, and Crete that changed the world.  Discover the story of the Cronide bloodline...

Facebook Link:

https://www.facebook.com/HiddenHumanStory/

 

Cherokee Testimony – Moon-Eyed People

Moon-eyed_people

 Plaque at Fort Mountain State Park[1] – Wikipedia – cc – uploaded by bot

 

Once again, here is another white skinned people who were expelled or exterminated by “Native Americans” in ancient times. This one was called the moon-eyed people and they were said to have light skin and poor vision in the day.  Per Wikipedia:

 

The moon-eyed people are a race of people from Cherokee tradition who are said to have lived in Appalachiauntil the Cherokee expelled them. They are mentioned in a 1797 book by Benjamin Smith Barton, who explains they are called “moon-eyed” because they saw poorly during the day. Later variants add additional details, claiming the people had white skin, that they created the area’s pre-Columbian ruins, and that they went west after their defeat.

 

In his 1902 Myths of the Cherokee, ethnographer James Mooney described a “dim but persistent tradition” of an ancient race who preceded the Cherokee in lower Appalachiaand were driven out by them. Accounts often describe this race as having white skin and credit them with building the ancient structures in the area. The earliest recorded mention of this race appears to be in Benjamin Smith Barton‘s 1797 book New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America. Citing the authority of Colonel Leonard Marbury, Barton wrote that “the Cheerake tell us, that when they first arrived in the country which they inhabit, they found it possessed by certain ‘moon-eyed-people,’ who could not see in the day-time. These wretches they expelled.”[2]Barton suggested these “moon-eyed people” were the ancestors of the albinosLionel Wafer encountered among the Kuna people of Panama, who were called “moon-eyed” because they could see better at night than day.[3][4]

 

Mooney links Barton’s “moon-eyed people” story to several similar accounts. One was by historian John Haywood who wrote in his 1823 The Natural and Aboriginal History of Tennessee of “white people, who were extirpated in part, and in part were driven from Kentucky, and probably also from West Tennessee”, attributing this to Indian tradition, although later Haywood mentions that in the 17th century the Cherokee encountered “white people” on the Little Tennessee River, and describes fortifications left by French that were surrounded by “hoes, axes, guns, and other metallic utensils”, adding that the Cherokee found no aboriginals when they arrived.[5] Mooney cites two further independent accounts from Cherokee individuals of his time, of a people who lived north of the Hiwassee River when the Cherokee arrived there, and then went west; one of these describes them as a “very small people, perfectly white”.[2]

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon-eyed_people